'Scrapping' rhino causes major mobilisation

Rhino immobilisation Botswana RCB.jpg

RCB's dedicated team is on-call 24/7. So when reports of an injured rhino came in late on Saturday evening, we rallied the troops and were ready to track down the animal at dawn the next day.

 Our Husky Aviat aircraft closes in on the rhinos with a veterinarian leaning out of the door, ready to dart them with a sedative

Our Husky Aviat aircraft closes in on the rhinos with a veterinarian leaning out of the door, ready to dart them with a sedative

As soon as our monitoring officers had located the bull, we mobilised the helicopter and our aeroplane to dart the animal. We assessed his injuries and concluded that they were just superficial wounds – a fat lip and a few scrapes – from fighting with another bull. So with a quick clean and spray of antiseptic, he was good to go on his way.

 As one of the rhinos sleeps peacefully, the other rhino is darted and guided to a gentle standstill

As one of the rhinos sleeps peacefully, the other rhino is darted and guided to a gentle standstill

Since the team was now in an area frequented by a couple of other rhinos we wanted to check up on, we sent the Husky aircraft to track them down. Both animals were successfully located and darted, and their tracking devices were replaced. We are delighted to confirm that they are in excellent condition. The Okavango Delta really is a perfect paradise for rhinos.

 When the rhinos are only partially sedated, they can be guided wherever the team needs them

When the rhinos are only partially sedated, they can be guided wherever the team needs them

2017 – another great year for rhinos

Dear friends,
2017 has been a year of mixed fortunes for rhinos. Though RCB is achieving more for rhino conservation in Botswana than we ever thought possible, elsewhere the number of rhinos being killed is still alarmingly high.

That’s why RCB’s work in Botswana is more important than ever. For the rhinos’ security, I can’t share the number of young born this year, but we’re proud that Botswana’s rhino numbers are increasing steadily. When other populations are in decline, every precious rhino calf is a cause for celebration – and a vital contribution to the world’s population. 

Read more about our rhino successes in 2017...

Men rewarded for reporting rhinos to RCB

Thanks to the honesty of three men working on a remote cattle outpost, two of Botswanas rare black rhinos are safely back where they belong. Map Ives went to thank them...

This week, Rhino Conservation Botswana’s director Map Ives and Regional Wildlife Officer Tim Blackbeard visited a remote cattle post in Makgadikgadi Pans to personally thank three men for helping to protect two black rhinos.

Help protect rhinos and win a luxury safari, courtesy of Safari Footprints

RCB's friends at Safari Footprints are raising money to translocate a family of rhinos from poaching hotspots in South Africa to safer and more secure environments here in Botswana, where they will be well protected by RCB and the Botswana government.

The cost of moving one rhino is USD $45,000. To help raise the funds, Safari Footprints is raffling two breathtaking luxury safaris valued at USD 50,000 and USD 75,000 respectively.

Find out more...

Black rhino wanderers are safely returned: Part 1

Earlier this month, two black rhinos had to be rescued by RCB when they went ‘walk about’ in a potentially dangerous area...

When the quick-thinking security team at a remote outpost in northeast Botswana call the Department of Wildlife and National Parks (DWNP) to say they have spotted a female black rhino and her large calf, Map Ives, RCB's director, sets about mobilising a team to bring these important animals back to safety – and fast!

RCB gets some hot new wheels!

Here at RCB in Maun, we’re very excited to have taken delivery of our new rhino monitoring vehicles. 

These sturdy trucks are specially adapted to cope with the unique challenges posed by the watery environment of the Okavango Delta – and fulfil their important mission: to keep Botswana’s rhinos safe.

So what makes these vehicles so special? Find out more here...

Video: RCB’s Map Ives talks rhinos with leading business magazine

RCBs Director Map Ives chats to Swedish journalist Mats Ögren Wanger from Veckans Affärer – Swedens leading business magazine – about protecting rhinos, joined-up thinking, ecotourism and the need for worldwide support.

“Innovation to me is to take an existing problem and look at it differently, with new eyes,” says Map, the brain behind the Botswana Government’s innovative approach to rhino conservation.

Find out more about the thinking behind RCB, the need to give black and white rhinos a safe haven from the poaching crisis – and how you can help.

Watch the video now.